2019 Annual Member Meeting & Picnic: July 6

2019 Annual Meeting is Saturday July 6, 2019 at Skinner Park Hall in Irons, MI

2018 Annual Meeting Minutes

Agenda
10:00am – Annual Meeting and Guest Speakers
Followed by Raffle and Lunch provided by the Indian Club — all members and guests encouraged to attend!

Our 23rd annual meeting promises to be one presenting much information and news about the state and health of the river and the workings of the Council over the past year and plans for this year, as well as a status report on the development of the Watershed Management Plan.

Guest speaker TBD

Following the business meeting and the raffles, lunch will be provided by members of the Indian Club.

As usual there will be a bucket raffle and a silent auction as well as the main raffle.

 

To purchase raffle ticketsplease fill out the contact us form and someone will contact you.

To donate raffle or silent auction itemsplease fill out the contact us form.

2018 Water Quality and Macroinvertebrate Survey Results

The 2018 Water Quality Survey results are in. Check out the Annual Water Quality Survey page for more information on the study and view the current and results from past years.

The 2018 Macroinvertebrate Study results can be found on our Annual Macroinvertebrate Study page.

Thank you to Joyce Durdel and team of volunteers for their continued hard work on these fantastic studies of the Little Manistee River from year to year.

 

2019 Study scheduled for May 19, rain date May 25.

 

 

Day with Nature at Magoon Creek

Coordinated by Deb Laws
Youth Agent, Manistee Co. 4-H
May 2017

On a brisk but enjoyable day in May, about 130 students from several Manistee area schools, came to the Magoon Creek Nature Center to have an out-door, hands-on classroom experience. Several Program Presenters shared their favorite topics about nature with the students. Featured below, Kayla Knoll, Conservation Specialist with Manistee Co. Conservation District, with help from Joyce Durdel, a volunteer with the Little Manistee Watershed Conservation Council, assist the students in learning that macroinvertabrates are unique aquatic insects that find their homes in streams like Magoon Creek. A number of ‘ooos’ and ‘yucks’ could be heard before the students began to find out how intriguing these insects really are. Soon the comments turned into ‘cool’ and ‘wow’ and ‘this really turns into a dragonfly?’.

natureday1

natureday2

natureday3

natureday4

 

(Pictures by Joyce Durdel)

2016 Water Quality and Macroinvertebrate Survey Results

The 2016 Water Quality Survey results are in. Check out the Annual Water Quality Survey page for more information on the study and view the current and results from past years.

The 2016 Macroinvertebrate Study results can be found on our Annual Macroinvertebrate Study page.

Thank you to Joyce Durdel and team for their continued hard work on these fantastic studies of the Little Manistee River from year to year.

 

Jim, Sylvie and Dave hard at work. Mark R. behind the camera.
Jim, Sylvie and Dave hard at work. Mark R. behind the camera.

 

A good variety indicates stream is healthy here
A good variety indicates stream is healthy here

 

 

Improvement on Carrieville Erosion sites

The LMWCC has been working in partnership with the Conservation Resource Alliance to improve a number of identified erosion sites on the Little Manistee River. This past summer we focused on three sites near Carrieville. A lot of hard work was put in and the results are great.

 

Carrieville Erosion Site #10 before
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 before
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 before (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 before (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 after
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 after
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 after (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #10 after (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 before
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 before
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 before (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 before (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 after
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 after
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 after (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #13 after (2)
Carrieville Erosion Site #16 before
Carrieville Erosion Site #16 before
Carrieville Erosion Site #16 after
Carrieville Erosion Site #16 after

 

 

2016 Macroinvertebrate Survey

Again this year a wonderful team of volunteers got together to test the Little Manistee River for Macroinvertebrates, we more commonly call this the “Bug Study”.

See the survey results here

Thanks to our volunteers! We appreciate the hard work.

 

A good variety indicates stream is healthy here.
A good variety indicates the stream is healthy at this location
Crane Fly Larva-Trout Dessert
Crane fly larva
Hellgrammite- Trout Lunch
Hellgramite
Jim, Sylvie and Dave hard at work. Mark R. behind the camera.
Jim, Sylvie and Dave in the stream
Ready! Bug Mission- Queen's Hwy site 5-21-2016
Jim, Sylvie and Dave again, hard at work

 

 

benthic macroinvertebrates
A variety of benthic macroinvertebrates viewed under a stereo microscope.
Source: G. Carter via NOAA/GLERL
 
The below article is reposted for your convenience, from: EPA Home » National Aquatic Resource Surveys » Indicators: Benthic Macroinvertebrates.

What are benthic macroinvertebrates?

Benthic (meaning “bottom-dwelling”) macroinvertebrates are small aquatic animals and the aquatic larval stages of insects. They include dragonfly and stonefly larvae, snails, worms, and beetles. They lack a backbone, are visible without the aid of a microscope and are found in and around water bodies during some period of their lives. Benthic macroinvertebrates are often found attached to rocks, vegetation, logs and sticks or burrowed into the bottom sand and sediments.

Why is it important to evaluate benthic macroinvertebrates?

Benthic macroinvertebrates are commonly used as indicators of the biological condition of waterbodies. They are reliable indicators because they spend all or most of their lives in water, are easy to collect and differ in their tolerance to pollution. Macroinvertebrates respond to human disturbance in fairly predictable ways, are relatively easy to identify in the laboratory, often live for more than a year and, unlike fish, have limited mobility.

In fact, because they cannot escape pollution, macroinvertebrates have the capacity to integrate the effects of the stressors to which they are exposed, in combination and over time. Biologists have been studying the health and composition of benthic macroinvertebrate communities for decades.

What do benthic macroinvertebrates tell us about the condition of water?

Evaluating the abundance and variety of benthic macroinvertebrates in a waterbody gives us an indication of the biological condition of that waterbody. Generally, waterbodies in healthy biological condition support a wide variety and high number of macroinvertebrate taxa, including many that are intolerant of pollution. Samples yielding only pollution–tolerant species or very little diversity or abundance may indicate a less healthy waterbody. Biological condition is the most comprehensive indicator of waterbody health. When the biology of a waterbody is healthy, the chemical and physical components of the waterbody are also typically in good condition. In addition to benthic macroinvertebrates, scientists also evaluate algae and fish populations to come up with robust estimates of biological condition.

Syers Creek Habitat Improvement Shows in Fish Numbers

In 2012, the LMWCC received a grant from Patagonia for $6,000 to improve fish habitat in Syers Creek, a tributary of the Little Manistee River. Comparison chart below shows striking improvement in fish numbers from 2012 to 2015 measurements.
A big thank you to the United States Forest Service for putting the data together for the LMWCC.
Species

Water temperature type

Range of water temperature preferences

(°F)

14 June 2012

22-24 July 2015

Number of fish caught

Size range

(TL mm)

Number of fish caught

Size range

(TL mm)

Black bullhead

Warm

46 – 86

  1

79

Bluegill

Warm

34 – 97

  6

  47 –   65

Brook stickleback

Cool

39 – 64

  2

  56 –   57

  3

33 –   51

Brook trout

Cold

34 – 72

  8

137 – 172

  7

45 – 211

Brown trout

Cold

41 – 78

25

  51 – 225

39

32 – 249

Central mudminnow

Cool

63 – 72

23

  78 –   46

47

44  –  80

Chinook salmon

Cold

32 – 75

11

36  –  90

Coho salmon

Cold

32 – 62

  8

38  –  90

Iowa darter

Cool

45 – 77

  1

67

Johnny darter

Cool

39 – 64

  7

42  –  51

Lamprey

Cool

NA

  2

NA

  1

115

Largemouth bass

Warm

59 – 90

  7

  66 –   98

Pumpkinseed sunfish

Warm

39 – 72

  8

  55 –   91

Rainbow trout

Cold

32 – 77

  2

  51 –   63

26

35 – 158

Sculpin

Cold

32 – 62

70

  52 – 100

79

23 – 108

Replacing Dead and Dying Ash Trees

Recently, some of the LMWCC members asked what tree species private landowners should look to plant to replace the ash trees that are currently dying. The question was posed to some of our MDNR Foresters, and the response is below. Thanks to Forester Blair Tweedale for a well-thought response!

In regards to your email, I would plant a mixture of black spruce and tamarack (50:50); with white pine in some areas. Black spruce and tamarack will do well in areas with a high water table. Black spruce thrive in poor soils, but can be found on some richer soil types, along with tamarack. White pine could also do good in certain locations. White pine grows on all soil types, and will do best mostly on the edges of the flood plain and on little ridges throughout. They can survive in higher water table areas also. The following notes should help determine where and how to plant these trees so they survive, and become beneficial to the watershed.

Black spruce is shade tolerant, so you can plant these trees in open sunlight, dead ash snag areas, or somewhat shaded stands. Where we have lost large expanses of our ash, plant a black spruce and tamarack mix, with approximately 8 ft X 8 ft spacing (this will give you about 680 trees per acre) on hummocks or dryer patches, not in standing water. Planting at this volume should result in a fully stocked stand, creating shade along our trout streams in the near future. Deer will not (well, should not) browse black spruce or tamarack. However, planting these trees in areas of thick grasses and sedges will inhibit their growth. I would recommend trimming the grasses around these planted trees 3 feet in all directions. Of course, trimming the grasses would not “control” competition. There are also tree mats (Vispore Tree Mats ) that I have seen used in areas where grasses and sedges are a problem. These add initial cost to a project, but can maximize your seedling growth and survival.

Planting white pine is another option. Planting white pine in areas that are on the edge of the flood plain, and on higher spots (hummocks or ridges) throughout. White pine is much more likely to survive than black spruce and tamarack on areas that are a little direr. However, deer may or may not browse white pine in these areas. I have seen deer browse white pine in some areas, and leave it alone in others. White pine can be longer lived and more readily reproduce naturally. Once large white pine are established on site, expect new seedlings to show up. Sedges and grasses with inhibit the initial growth, but white pine are probably more tolerant to the grass competition. Tree mats would help their initial survival.

A mixture of these three tree species, given the location, would be my recommendation.

Tree mats (bundle of 100): http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/product_pages/Products.asp?mi=16221&itemnum=43586

http://pacforest.com/Item/87

Craft paper mulch mats: http://pacforest.com/Item/85

100’ roll: http://www.gardeners.com/buy/biodegradable-weed-mat/37-434.html

Tree mat staples (box of 1000): http://www.forestry-suppliers.com/product_pages/Products.asp?mi=67411&itemnum=25019&redir=Y

tree-mat

 

Blair A. Tweedale Jr.
Forester
Michigan Department of Natural Resources

Johnson Bridge River Access Project

A better way to access the river is now available where the Johnson Bridge crosses the Little Manistee.

LMWCC member and TiKi Lodge owner was concerned about how the steep bank at the bridge was eroding into the river due to the foot traffic of people accessing the river at this site. He asked the LMWCC to look into a solution to prevent the erosion and divert river users onto a new path. LMWCC vice president, Jim Squiers, along with members Joyce Durdel and Lou Fitz, consulted with Steve Leonard of the Lake County Road Commisson about a possible plan to address the property owner’s concerns and that would also be acceptable to the road commission that holds the right-of-way at this site.

Through the collaborative efforts of the LCRC, the TiKi Lodge owner, and funding by the Jay Jorgensen Family Foundation through the LMWCC, an access ramp designed by Steve Leonard was installed before the Memorial Day holiday weekend. Some natural landscaping and finishing touches will be added soon to complete the project.

Pictured below, Lou Fitz observes the progress while LCRC’s Kelly Gallentine, Josh Myers and Randy Sparks start work on the ramp by the Johnson Bridge.

 

JohnsonBridgeAccess-1
during the work project

 

JohnsonBridgeAccess-2
River access after the work is done

2015 Annual Meeting and Picnic: July 11

2015 Annual Meeting is Saturday July 11, 2015 at Skinner Park Hall in Irons, MI.

Agenda
10:00am – Annual Meeting and Guest Speakers
Followed by Raffle and Lunch provided by the Indian Club — all members and guests encouraged to attend!

This year’s Annual Meeting will feature presentations from the members of the Board of Trustees on the state of the Council including its finances and progress on fish habitat and stream improvement projects.

 

Raffle and Drawings

  • Present members will be entered into a door prize drawing.
  • Members who have volunteered in the past year will be entered into a volunteer door prize drawing.
  • Silent Auction will take place and will include hand-tied flies, fly fishing lesson, jackets from Wolverine World Wide and more!

 

Raffle Ticket prizes include:

First Prize –  Kevlar Canoe

Second Prize – Two – Kayak Package

Third Prize – Handmade Fly Rod

 

To purchase raffle ticketsplease fill out the contact us form and someone will contact you.

To donate raffle or silent auction itemsplease fill out the contact us form.

Annual Meeting
Nate Winkler, a biologist at the Conservation Resource Alliance (CRA), presenting at 2014 Annual Meeting

 

A few of the items in the bucket raffle at 2014 Annual Meeting
A few of the items in the bucket raffle at 2014 Annual Meeting